Thursday, January 29, 2015

Episode 153, Odds of Another American Revolution

What are the odds of another revolution in America?

Thomas Jefferson asked long ago: "What country ever existed a century and a half without a rebellion?"

He followed that question with another: "What country can preserve its liberties if their rulers are not warned from time to time that their people preserve the spirit of resistance?"

Although Jefferson believed that "a little rebellion now and then is a good thing, and as necessary in the political world as storms in the physical", we certainly haven't had any lately. It's been a century and a half since the Civil War, the last internal conflict in America that could qualify as a revolution.

In this show, I discuss the potential for another American Revolution. What would it take for revolutionary thoughts to become action? Who would participate? Who would oppose the revolutionaries? Today, millions of Americans hold the federal government in contempt, yet they tolerate it, for fear of the consequences. What forces or events would tip enough of them from passive contempt to active resistance and allow a revolution to begin? And what would happen once a revolution got underway?

Too big a subject for one show--one hour is only enough to get us started. Be sure to come back for Part 2.

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2 comments:

  1. Thanks for another podcast! I always enjoy them.

    The problem we have is a fully indoctrinated population. So what would make them have a John Hancock moment? Could a sense of inequity in Obamacare flip them once it really gets underway?

    TPTB's weakness is that it can not match low-level personal relationships. They only understand impersonal central control; mandates; incentives.

    Their authority may fail as various localities start opting out.

    Waiting to hear more!

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  2. Mike, many thanks for listening. Good idea--Obamacare may do it for some, though I think big numbers will come from another cause. I think you are onto something by thinking locally.

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